Robert U. Montgomery

Pets, as Well as Wildlife, Endangered by Discarded Fishing Tackle, Line

dog hook

Discarded fishing line, especially with attached hooks and baits, maims or kills a multitude of fish and wildlife species annually. I've written about this often, encouraging anglers to pick up after themselves, as well as the slobs who give our sport a bad name by tossing their discarded line and lures, as well as other trash, in the water and along the shorelines.

Discarded fishing line, especially with attached hooks and baits, maims or kills a multitude of fish and wildlife species annually. I've written about this often, encouraging anglers to pick up after themselves, as well as the slobs who give our sport a bad name by tossing their discarded line and lures, as well as other trash, in the water and along the shorelines.

Some loss of line and lures is inevitable, especially on underwater snags. But through responsible stewardship, we can minimize this problem.

Want another reason that this is important? Check out this x-ray of a treble hook inside a dog. This happened to a neighbor's pet.

Fortunately, the animal was not seriously injured and the veterinarian was able to remove the hook.

Seeing this reminded me that, last year, my own dog, Pippa, became entangled in a mass of discarded line and panicked as she tried to escape it. Thankfully, the line didn't have a hook attached and she wasn't injured.

Please, be responsible and vigilant this summer regarding discarded fishing line, not only for fish and wildlife, but for man's best friend as well.

Many states have line recycling programs, as well as provide helpful information on their websites and in their publications, including how to build line recycling bins. Florida's site (below)
is one of the best all-around sources.


Reel. Remove. Recycle. Don't Leave Your Line Behind
http://mrrp.myfwc.com/