Robert U. Montgomery

Childrens Books

Halloween Treat From Book That You Will Enjoy Year Around

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Halloween is one of the times that I remember best from my childhood, a simpler time when many Baby Boomers were growing up. This is an excerpt from "Dracula's Disciple" in Under the Bed: Tales From An Innocent Childhood. If you were a child during the 50s, 60s, or 70s, this book will take you back in time and awaken your own fond memories.

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Who Let the Frogs Out?

Who Let the Frogs Out?




My second illustrated children's book,
Who Let the Frogs Out?, will be out this fall. These books teach kids about nature and encourage them to go outside to experience it for themselves.


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Here's an excerpt:

* * * *
When it got dark enough, we'd chase and catch fireflies, which our parents also called "lightning bugs." One night, Matt said that we should feed some of the bugs to a toad. "I'll bet his belly would light up," he said.

And he was right. It did! A little ball of light bounced up and down on the road in the dark as the toad hopped away. We laughed until our sides hurt. And the toad got a free supper, so I think that he liked it too.

Matt was like the "mad scientist" of our group that we called "The Four Musketeers." He made the best grades and knew lots of stuff that the rest of us didn't. My name is Bobby. And I tell you all about our gang--- Matt, Carl, Benny, and me--- in
Who Let the Bugs Out? If you haven't read it, you should!

* * * *

You can check out
Who Let the Bugs Out? at my Amazon author page. I also have Bass Fishing for Kids in Kindle format.

https://www.amazon.com/Robert-U-Montgomery/e/B005J1K9T2/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

A More Innocent Time

How did you discover that Santa Claus isn't real?

As a college composition teacher, I asked my students to write essays about that. Following the obligatory moans and groans expressed for every assignment and some pretend indignation that I had spoiled the holiday with this revelation, they wrote wonderful stories of childhood innocence lost.

As a writer and editor, as well as teacher, I can "read" the motivation in someone's writing and I have no doubt that this assignment moved them, as they shared their memories. Some were funny. One was tragic. All were insightful. With their permission, I shared the stories with the class, as we all came to realize that almost everyone who celebrates Christmas has had this experience.

My own is what prompted that assignment, as well as my book
Under the Bed: Tales From an Innocent Childhood. You can read how I made the discovery in the essay by the same name. Also, you can read about a secret Santa who brought presents to a Jewish friend and her family in "The Shiny Red Fire Truck."

Overall,
Under the Bed is about growing up during a more innocent time, before we allowed so much of our lives to be ruled by technology. It's about family vacations in the station wagon, crazy relatives, and playing outside until dark during the summer. It's about a time when the new television season was a big deal in the fall and kids fell asleep with their transistor radios under their pillows, listening to rock and roll music.


Robert Montgomery - Copy

Here's Why Nature Is Good for Kids:

Laura and Lily fishing

It builds confidence. The way that kids play in nature has a lot less structure than most types of indoor play. There are infinite ways to interact with outdoor environments, from the backyard to the park to the local hiking trail or lake, and letting your child choose how he treats nature means he has the power to control his own actions.

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Fan Letter for Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies: Growing Up With Nature

This letter was sent to me by a young man. It contains wonderful insights from a young man whose father tells me that he is on the autism spectrum.
* * * * *
Dear Robert Montgomery,

I love your book. I love it because I love the outdoors and everything about it. I agree that kids today use computers too much. I also love this book because it teaches me about everything from fish to frogs, toads to crawdads.
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Pippa and Zeus: Tales of Two Lost Dogs

Just about six years ago, I lost my best friend, Pippa.

I had adopted her a few months before. She was an adult dog who had spent her first two years of life in a shelter, and adjusting to life in the outside world was both exhilarating and frightening for her.

For example, with a stream-lined body, she was born to run, and now she could. And she did, often streaking in joyful manic circles around the yard after we came back from long walks. She daily rolled on her back in the grass, moaning ecstatically. And when it was just the two of us, she was the happiest dog in the world.

But strangers frightened her. So did sudden noises. And on that fateful day six years ago, a week before Fourth of July, someone set off firecrackers early on a Saturday morning.


Pippa loves rolling in the grass

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Welcome

Nature was my first love, and time has not diminished the passion.

Nature also was my teacher. From her, I learned about love and loyalty, life and death, kindness and compassion. And yes, the birds and bees.

My books, both fiction and non-fiction, are a tribute to my first love and mentor. Read them and you will know me. Read them and, I hope, you will learn, laugh, cry, and maybe even wax nostalgic about your own time spent in the outdoors, especially as a child. Read them and, I hope, you will be inspired to spent more time in nature.

And take your kids along. Youngsters in today's world are more in need of that introduction than any of generations past.

Share my books with them too, especially
Who Let the Bugs Out?, which I wrote especially for young readers.

Another I wrote with adults in mind, but children discovered it and enjoy many of its stories as well. At a book signing, one little girl told me that "the one about the toads" was her favorite in
Fish, Frogs, and Fireflies: Growing Up With Nature. I've included an excerpt from that tale at the end of this post.

I'll add more excerpts from my books occasionally on this site, as well as news about them. I'll also include articles, essays, and stories about nature, animals, and the outdoors, including my adventures, some intentional and others not so much. Maybe I'll even write about writing from time to time.

Please check back to find out what's new. Now here's that excerpt from the story about the tiny toad invasion of my grandmother's house, and how I might have been to blame:

* * * * * *

I’m not sure how much time passed, maybe thirty minutes or maybe an hour. Sprawled on the kitchen floor, I was intently drawing cowboys when my grandmother screamed. As my grandfather came running, she pointed frantically toward the door of my bedroom.

I’m not sure how it happened. When I looked later, the box was overturned. Probably it flipped over when I threw it under the bed. But who is to say? Possibly the toads had climbed on each others’ backs and popped off the lid. As they marched out of the bedroom door, they seemed to be engaged in a coordinated counter-attack.

My grandmother already was infamous for taking off her dress in the front yard when a grasshopper fell down her back. Her response to the toads was just as noteworthy. As their collective mass spread like some Biblical plague, swallowing up the linoleum floor, she jumped from chair to table, screaming “Ernest! Do something!”

From there, time blurred. But here is what I know: Some little known, but immutable law of science must state that toads placed in a cigar box under a feather bed will multiply exponentially.